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t.e. 178

hella jongerius

Designer Hella Jongerius (1963) is considered one of the major designers of her generation for the special way in which she fuses industry and craft, high and low tech, tradition and the contemporary.

Jongerius studied at the Design Academy Eindhoven in the 1990s, a period in which a (mainly) Dutch phenomenon was born: conceptual design. After her graduation in 1993, she contributed to a few projects for Droog Design. Since 1998 she has worked for various design brands, museums and galleries. Jongerius has won prestigious prizes for her innovative designs. Her industrial products and experimental designs are presented in museums and galleries such as The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, New York, Villa Noailles, Hyères, Galerie kreo, Paris, Stedelijk Museum ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, the Design Museum, London, Museum Het Princessehof, Leeuwarden, Cibone, Tokyo and Moss Gallery, New York. Industrial clients include the Swiss furniture manufacturer Vitra, the American textile manufacturer Maharam, the Swedish furniture company IKEA, the Spanish shoe company Camper and the ceramic companies Royal Tichelaar Makkum (Netherlands) and Nymphenburg (Germany).

The designer’s studio, Jongeriuslab, was located in Rotterdam until 2008. Since then she has lived and worked in Berlin.

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t.e. 178deep platter, white

Hella Jongerius emphasises the transition between transparent and white by having the platter immersed partly in the tin glaze. By doing this, she not only focuses attention on the production process by making it part of the decoration, but reveals the colour of the Friesian clay for the first time in centuries. In addition to the white version, there is also a decorated version in this series, inspired by simple rural motifs and painted outlines inspired by the majolica archives. The result is a series of attractive products with a contemporary allusion to history and special use of traditional skills.

t.e. 178read more
t.e. 174red white vase

Together with the Big White Pot, the Red White Vase has become a modern classic. Both are the end result of Hella Jongerius exploration of medieval pots. Hella Jongerius cast these two vessels from the moulds of restored medieval pots. The rough casting seams, along with the potter's traditional thumbprint, give the impression of antique vessels while the strong, solid forms are a clear indications of modern industry.

t.e. 174read more
t.e. 173big white pot

Together with the Red White Vase, the Big White Pot has become a modern classic. Both are the end result of Hella Jongerius exploration of medieval pots. Hella Jongerius cast these two vessels from the moulds of restored medieval pots. The rough casting seams, along with the potter's traditional thumbprint, give the impression of antique vessels while the strong, solid forms are a clear indications of modern industry.

t.e. 173read more
t.e. 172b-set plate small, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 172read more
t.e. 171b-set plate large, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 171read more
t.e. 170b-set carafe, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 170read more
t.e. 169b-set bowl large, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 169read more
t.e. 168b-set bowl small, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 168read more
t.e. 167b-set beaker large, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 167read more
t.e. 166b-set beaker small, white

In 1999 we put into production Hella Jongerius' seven-part porcelain dinner service.  In an industry where, since industrialisation, perfection has become the norm, in this design Hella Jongerius focuses on the concept of 'imperfection'. She studied the possibilities of restoring individuality to the serial production process, an important recurring theme in her work. During a period she spent working at the European Ceramics Work Centre in ‘s Hertogenbosch (1997) she experimented with clay by firing it at a high temperature, which distorted each piece. This is how she developed the method for producing the B-Set, in which each piece acquires its own unique character and regains its individuality.
The B-Set is now considered an icon of Dutch design history and has been included in the collections of many international museums.
t.e. 166read more
t.e. 144thomas eyck  is pleased to present an exclusive series of vases designed by  Hella Jongerius. She has become known for the way in which she fuses industry and craft, high and low tech, the traditional and the contemporary. For some time, Jongerius has been occupied with an intensive research project on applying colours to ceramic materials. Jongerius has produced the Hella Jongerius: Misfit Collector’s Edition: 300 unique porcelain vases, each made with great artisanal skill and technological sophistication in collaboration with the venerable Dutch ceramics house Royal Tichelaar Makkum. Each vase is an object of exceptional concept and beauty.

This set is the culmination of Jongerius’ experimental studies with lacquered pigmentation, in which the porcelain vase has served as a ‘canvas’ for ‘Toyota red’ spraypaint (Red White Vase, 1997), forty industrial colours from the Central European standard RAL colour range (Coloured Vases, Series 1, 2003), and selections from the Scandinavian Colour Institute’s Natural Colour System (Coloured Vases, Series 2, 2007). In this, the third version of 300 Coloured Vases, each vase was fired three times under a unique mix of 100 natural mineral glazes and 100 synthetic materials, yielding remarkably deep textures and vibrantly merged colour combinations that are reminiscent of the colour intensities of old paintings.

The Hella Jongerius Coloured Vases, Series 3 is a rare opportunity to own a genuine limited edition of a Hella Jongerius’ experimental design. Each comprises a special edition of a book, designed by Irma Boom. It  is beautifully bound, individually signed and numbered and presented in a custom-made box, together with an original work of art also signed and numbered by the artist.
t.e. 144read more